Interview: Ann Ogbomo on ‘Krypton’, ‘Justice League’ & Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre

ANN OGBOMO is taking on the iconic mantle of General Zod in the new series ‘Krypton’ – set hundreds of years prior to the birth of Superman.

Ann is best known for her illustrious theatre career. A favourite of Michael Boyd and Phyllida Lloyd, Ann has worked extensively with the Royal Shakespeare Company and will undoubtedly bring the full gravitas of her training and experience with theatrical drama to her role in ‘Krypton’.

She is perhaps best recognised in the role of an Amazonian warrior last seen in Warner Brothers’ ‘Justice League’, following her debut in the role as part of Patty Jenkins’ ‘Wonder Woman’ in 2017.

AC: You were in two of the biggest blockbuster movies of last year – ‘Wonder Woman’ and ‘Justice League’. How did you land the roles?

ANN: I landed Philippus in ‘Wonder Woman’ by passing a dynamic and rigorous audition process. As well as meeting with casting in the preliminary stages, I had to do pass various physical tests from horse riding and general fitness to armed combat. Once I had passed all of these stages I got to meet with the director Patty Jenkins.

Do you have any funny stories from the sets?

In general when anyone fluffs a line in an intense moment I am the worse for corpsing (laughing). A serious train of thought followed by an expletive is a sure winner.

You are the first ever-woman to portray ‘General Zod’ in the Superman universe – where did you look to for inspiration with the performance?

I’m the first woman to play General Zod’s Grandma. The show is set 200 years before Superman’s Birth and there were many Zods that came before the general we a familiar with as Superman’s nemesis. In the show, I’m actually referred to as Primus. My inspiration came primarily from the text. The character was so clear to me from the page that I worked mainly on instinct. Throughout the filming process I immersed myself in books that were relevant to the role. These helped to confirm I was making the right choices and keep me occupied during long off set periods.

Tell us about the character – where does she fit into the story?

She’s a warrior, a leader and a mother. She is responsible for protecting the City of Kandor from all external and internal threats. Her inherent role is to maintain and ensure the continuance of the Zod legacy which is grounded in honor and putting the states safety before one’s own interests.

If you could have a superpower what would it be?

Foresight

Do you enjoy filming abroad?

I loved filming the pilot in Belgrade. Its a unique city with a lot of character. There were so many independent shops to explore. It’s how I imagine the Kings Road and Shoreditch were once upon a time.

Who do you particularly enjoy working with on-set?

No one, they are all horrible [laughs]. It’s glorious working with directors who are responsive to the relationship between characters and their nuances.

You’ve also been doing a lot of theatre, are you looking to do some more in the near future?

I have a theatre project lined up that I am really excited about. It’s is an unseen play written by Shelagh Delaney and her daughter, Charlotte. Shelagh wrote the first act of the play in the seventies as a response to her daughter running away from home. Charlotte wrote the second act, set thirty years later, looking at the relationship between a mother and daughter.

What’s it like performing at The Globe?

It’s the closest I’ll ever get to being a rock star. The audience are like no other in the theatre.

Across all your projects, what’s the funniest directors note you’ve ever received?

The late John Barton who I worked with a lot at the Royal Shakespeare Company saw me after a show he had seen at the Donmar and said “the actress who played Worcester was quite good.” I don’t think he realised it was me.

PHOTOGRAPHY: RACHELL SMITH

INTERVIEW: ADAM CROOKES

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Interview: Jessica Keenan Wynn in ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’

Jessica Keenan Wynn Photoshoot 2018

JESSICA KEENAN WYNN is starring in the summer musical that will get you dancing on your feet and filled with nostalgia – ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’.

In the film, Jessica portrays a younger version of  Christine Baranski’s character Tanya Chesham-Leigh. Jessica stars alongside Lily James and Alexa Davies.

Jessica was born and raised in Los Angeles and comes from the Wynn family acting dynasty. She is a descendant of television and film acting legend Ed Wynn, 30s and 40s film star Keenan Wynn and silent film star Frank Keenan. She currently resides in New York where she is starring in the Broadway musical ‘Beautiful’.

We talk to Jessica about all things ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’.

AC: You’re a descendant of Ed Wynn who had an incredible prominence as an Actor in the 1930s and 40s. How influential do you think your family history has been in your own career choice?

JESSICA: I suppose I never grew out of playing pretend. When I was little, old movies, MGM musicals, and award shows were viewed in rotation. I was introduced to my grandparents with movies like Alice in Wonderland, Mary Poppins and For Me and My Gal. Obviously, I felt incredibly connected to the medium and one that allowed me to forge a relationship with family I had never met. Through performing, I was creating connective tissue with them and a posthumous bond. I developed a deep passion to carry on my family’s legacy. In the beginning it was daunting to walk in the massive footprints of my grandparents (all great great, great, and grand of them). Now I am so proud to wear that name and feel like I can properly stand among them with elation and adoration.

Do you think that this history has informed how you’ve approached working on this business?

Absolutely. The quality I admired so much about my grandfather, Keenan Wynn, was his desire to not only do good work, but to work! It wasn’t about being #1 on the call sheet or the leading man in a picture. It boiled down to flexing as many muscles within his talent as he could. His library of work has had a tremendous influence on my desire to play as many different parts as wonderfully different as possible.

Jessica Keenan Wynn

What was your first introduction to ‘Mamma Mia’?

I saw the first national touring production of Mamma Mia in Los Angeles with my mom. I bought the soundtrack and was an immediate fan of the show, and thus of ABBA. The best part about being introduced to their music through the production were the stories of people a generation ahead of me who grew up listening to ABBA. One generation was developing a new sense memory to their songs and the other reveling in the nostalgia of their music. They broke Musical barriers and thrive to this day for a reason. There’s truly nothing quite like their magical reach.

In this sequel, you portray a younger version of Christine Baranski’s character – how did you go about preparing for that?

I have always been a massive fan of Christine’s work. Her talent has influenced me for years and years. This woman carries herself with such poise, grace, professionalism and care. She is as profound on camera as she is off. It was the greatest joy to go back and watch her films to try and capture her essence. She commands a room with her smile, her charm and her wit. Ever sense I put young Tanya on, I can’t seem to shake her off and I’m perfectly fine with that.

Jessica Keenan Wynn

The film really does have an all-star cast. Was there anyone that you were particularly starstruck by?

Cher. Meryl. Cher. Meryl. Cher. Meryl. Need I say more? Meryl was exuberant and warm. I was so familiar with her work that it felt like reuniting with an old friend. Is that how superfans are born? Ek! Cher is a legend. I was too afraid to talk to her because I just wanted to watch her work. It’s horrifying meeting your idols, but also the dreamiest of scenarios. She’s truly one of the greatest artists of our time. I have to add, I was honestly struck by the sheer love the young cast developed for each other. I love the 5 of them so deeply it’s soul reaching. I have no doubt that the bond we created will last for the rest of our lives. 

Can you recall any particular funny stories from on-set?

One of my favorite memories on set was adlibbing with Alexa, who plays Young Rosie, at the end of a scene that takes place at the Taverna in Greece. Our brilliant director/writer, Ol Parker, wrote some hilarious lines to close the scene and then allowed us to play. If you give Alexa and I an inch, we will take a football field. We proceeded to bark varying adlibs at each other until we had the crew peeing their pants with laughter. If you can tell, it was the most remarkable set to be on. It really was a great big family.

Jessica Keenan Wynn

Do you have a favorite ABBA song?

I’m now a huge fan of “Andante Andante.” Lily James sings a stunning rendition of it in the film. But the song I sing in the shower most would have to be “The Name of The Game.” I love how the melody builds. Once again, Lily hits it out of the park with her version in the film. I can’t wait to listen to it on repeat!

Having grown up in LA, how are you finding New York life?

NY is the largest duality I’ve ever encountered. It’s intense, invigorating, chaotic, graceful, brutal, effortless, beautiful, harrowing and home. I do miss having my feet in grass and listening to the ocean on the coast of CA, but NYC teaches you so much about your limits and when to test them. I grew up in Los Angeles, but I found myself in New York. 

Do you see Broadway as one of the unique challenges that New York has to offer?

Absolutely. Broadway was the ultimate dream. I still pinch myself when I arrive at the theatre every night. With any dream comes a lot of discipline. Doing 8 shows a week is no easy feat. Relationships and friendships can suffer. Self care takes over and self love must be present. It is the most rewarding and most demanding experience I’ve ever had to endure.  But I’ve never had a family like the Broadway community. It’s truly the most accepting group of lovely artists I can imagine.

‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ is in cinemas now

PHOTOGRAPHY: IRA L. BLACK

INTERVIEW: ADAM CROOKES

HAIR: NATE ROSENKRANZ

MAKEUP: JOSEE LEDUC

STYLING: ASHLEY PRUITT

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Interview: Moya Angela takes to the West End with ‘Dreamgirls’

Moya Angela Photoshoot 2018

MOYA ANGELA is building a reputation in theatre on both sides of the Atlantic – with Broadway and West End roles. The Indiana-born performer landed her first major stage role in the Tony Award Winning Broadway musical – ‘The Lion King‘ – shortly after leaving Kentucky University.

After her contract with ‘The Lion King’ ended, Angela went home to recoup from being on the road for two and a half years. It was soon after this that she was asked to fly to New York City to audition for the role of Effie White in a tour of of the iconic Broadway musical ‘Dreamgirls’.

Alongside her leading role in ‘Dreamgirls’ – Moya Angela auditioned in 2016 for ‘America’s Got Talent’, in which she reached the semi-finals. To help share her experience of making it in theatre, Angela is an ambassador for Broadway in the H.O.O.D – an organisation that helps open doors to young aspiring performers.

I had a chat with Moya Angela about her time in both Broadway and West End productions.

What was your first experience of seeing Broadway?

My first experience was seeing Ragtime. It was such an amazing show and had me hooked immediately, especially seeing Audra McDonald.

Can you pinpoint some of the differences between Broadway and the West End? Does it feel like a different culture all together?

As far as the calibre of shows, they are on the same plane. The only main difference is location. The West End has a very high standard of performers just as Broadway does. It’s pretty cool to know that I have two great options to work at and be around such great talent.

Which do you prefer?

Honestly, either one, as long as I stay working. Glad I have options now.

Do you have a technique to warm up your voice before a performance?

I have levels to my warm up. As soon as I wake, I start speaking and warming my voice. Checking on where I am that day. Then closer to the show, I make sure I’ve eaten and I then get more intense with my warm up. I never sing too much to ensure I have a vocally strong show. It’s a process.

Moya Angela Photoshoot 2018

‘Dreamgirls’ has been around for almost four decades, what will people see in this new West End show?

They will see so much more of the glitz and glamour – it looks like it came straight out of the 60’s . The costumes and staging are nods straight from the original piece. And of course, the singing is unmatchable. Powerhouse vocals all around!

Many great actresses have played the role in Effie White, are you drawing from any of them in your portrayal?

Yes, if anything, I draw it straight from the original Jennifer Holiday. Her strength and courage. But I also draw just from myself. I’ve played this role now for eight years. You have to get it from places that are real inside yourself or else it will not come across to the audience properly.

Moya Angela Photoshoot 2018You’re an Ambassador for Broadway in The H.O.O.D, what does that involve?

Broadway in the H.O.O.D is a non-profit organization that provides a place for people in the inner city to learn what it takes to be a Broadway star. ‘Helping Others Open Doors’ is what hood stands for. We teach young and old; dancing, singing and acting at no cost to them. Bringing in trained professionals such as myself to help train. We then put on shows at the Smith Centre in Las Vegas, which is the only equity theatre. I love everything this organization teaches and stands for and will always be a proud ambassador.

Does Broadway have a representation problem?

The world has a representation problem. I think Broadway needs to be more diverse in the background which will allow more colourful stories in the forefront.

Moya Angela in 'Dreamgirls'
Photo by Dewynters

It’s been a few years now since you were a semi-finalist on ‘America’s Got Talent’, what did you learn from the experience?

That you don’t need to win to win. It taught me I was in the right place doing the right thing. If you keep going forward, you will reach the finish line eventually. Maybe not at the pace you desired, but it will be the one that works better for you.

QUICK QUESTIONS WITH MOYA ANGELA

Last movie you watched?

‘Black Panther’ – Wakanda forever [laughs]

Best show to binge-watch?

‘Scandal’

What’s the strangest food combo you’ve ever had?

A chicken and donut sandwich – don’t judge [laughs]

What’s on your music playlist at the moment?

Black Coffee House Music

Everyone has a cool app idea, what’s yours?

Chef delivery!

Best present you’ve ever received?

Candy with my face on it.

Worst joke you’ve ever heard?

All the chickens crossed the road once.

Last book you read?

‘The Beach House’ by Mary Alice Monroe

Would you rather be at a mountain hideaway or a beach house?

Duh…Beach House.

Do you have a philosophy?

Everything happens for a reason.

One thing in particular that you’re really excited about for the future?

Recording an album.

To see Moya Angela as Effie White at the Savoy Theatre please go to DreamGirlsWestEnd.com

Check out Moya’s Instagram & Twitter

PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL BLACK

INTERVIEW: ADAM CROOKES

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Interview: Rudi Dharmalingam on BBC’s ‘The Split’ Divorce Drama

Rudi Dharmalingam Photoshoot 2018

Like many actors, RUDI DHARMALINGAM didn’t have a straight path to success. After graduating from the prestigious National Youth Theatre, Rudi payed the bills by selling conservatories in between acting auditions. With roles in ‘New Tricks’, ‘Doctor Who’, ‘Rellik’ & ‘Casualty’, he now finds himself at the center of a major new BBC drama – ‘The Split’.

Rudi stars alongside Nicola Walker in ‘The Split’ – which centers around the fast-paced world of London’s divorce law circuit.

Written by the acclaimed Abi Morgan (‘The Iron Lady’, ‘Suffragette’), the series focuses on a family of female divorce lawyers who are forced to face their past following the return of their estranged father after a 30-year absence. We caught up with Rudi to talk about his journey to this point in his career and to find out about his new show ‘The Split’.

AC: What was your biggest take-away from your time at the National Youth Theatre?

RD: Whilst studying A-Level Theatre Studies I started to think more seriously about acting as a career. However, because I’d always prioritised my school work and table tennis over everything thing else I never had the time to get involved with a local theatre group. When it came around to completing my UCAS form for Universities I had nothing in the way of experience of theatre and performing with the exception of a school production. A friend of mine who was also a keen actor discovered the National Youth Theatre. We both thought it would be a good thing to have under our belts. We applied and magically we were both successful. Collaborating so closely with such a talented group of young people everyday, all day, was one of the best experiences of my life. It left me hungry for more and was a wonderfully inspiring thing to do at such a young age. I would say the main take away from that period was that it instilled a sense of collaboration and a strong teamwork ethic in all my work to date.


At the point when you were auditioning for roles trying to break into the industry whilst selling conservatories, was there ever any self-doubt?

Lots. Upon graduation, the sudden realisation that you are now responsible for paying rent, bills, food, council tax etc hits you hard. I had to find a job. I started selling conservatories because I had lots of experience in call centres whilst doing my A-Levels and degree. But also because my boss was willing to give me lots of flexibility regarding which shifts I worked so I was able to fit auditions in around my life as a salesman. Caroline, if you’re reading this, Thank You! I did this for two years. It was pretty soul destroying. As a young actor, the rejection is tough and it’s impossible for self doubt not to creep in. I’m still in a constant state of self doubt now, I don’t think that will ever change.

Rudi Dharmalingam Photoshoot 2018

 
Something that audiences won’t necessarily know about you is that you were a county and national table tennis player in your youth – between acting do you still get time to play table tennis?

Table tennis was something I wholeheartedly threw myself into from the age of 7. I stopped playing competitively when I was 16 when I discovered a new hobby – which I’m still doing and lucky enough to call my job. The dedication, work ethic and commitment I had for table tennis have all become a major part of my life as an actor. Those qualities I needed to succeed in sport are now a major part of how I live my life now. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to swing a bat anymore. I miss it dearly. 

Tell us about your role in ‘The Split’…

James is the fiancé of Rose, the youngest of the Defoe’s.  She’s the only one who’s not a divorce lawyer, she’s a nanny.  She’s in a situation where she’s not quite sure what she wants. James grounds her, they’ve got a purity to their relationship in contrast to the opulence or high-class environment of the law industry.  James works in finance, he’s got his own flat, his mum and dad are still together.  I think that James is one of life’s good ones. I’ve played a lot of off-centre characters in the past but James has to be one of the nicest and most stable of the lot. 

Rudi Dharmalingam 2018 Photoshoot


What was it like reading Abi Morgan’s scripts?

An absolute joy and pleasure. She writes people really really well. The character jumps off the page immediately, so as an actor its pretty easy to imagine who that person is. 
 
We’ve heard that for your recent role as Catholic ‘Mortimer’ in Mary Stuart you took counsel from a Catholic priest and went to Rome to experience the Vatican – what was that like?

Before every project I want to do loads of research.  However it’s not always possible because before you know it you’re in the rehearsal room. When we did the show at The Almeida I managed to meet with a Catholic Priest which was of course really informative and interesting. Prior to the West End run I had some time to do the research I always wanted to do. I got a flight out to Rome and immersed myself in the spirit of Catholicism, The Vatican, The Basilica, and the Sistine Chapel. Mortimer, the character I play has converted from Protestantism to Catholicism and is seduced by the theatricality of Rome. I suppose I wanted to see those iconic buildings in the flesh, so I could have a proper memory rather than just work off images pulled from Google. 

Rudi Dharmalingam Photoshoot 2018 


Would you describe yourself as a ‘method actor’?

No I wouldn’t. I’m glad you asked me this as it’s a subject that interests me greatly. When I was 16 I read Stanislavski’s ‘An Actor Prepares.’ Upon completion of this iconic book I was filled with enthusiasm for this weird thing we call acting. It provided me with a structure and ‘a system’ to follow when approaching a role. I think most actors use his ideas in their work but to varying degrees. I’m a firm believer in hard work and commitment and I will do whatever is necessary to get to where I need to be when forming a character. Whether that’s going on a Palaeolithic Diet which is what I did for The Events at The Young Vic, or forming tangible real memories from personal experience by going to The Vatican for Mary Stuart. Sometimes hard work and focus is ridiculed in our profession and I’ve been in situations before where I find myself apologising. I don’t know any other way of working. I’m not a method actor but I immerse myself into every project with 110% commitment. 

 
How did you get into your role in ‘The Split’?

James has a sinus issue which results in a constant runny nose. My father-in-law is a GP and I asked him if there was anything I could take to induce a runny nose. He actually said if took a bit more Sudofed that what’s recommended as it may result in the opposite effect. I didn’t fancy overdosing on sinus decongestant. But I always had a real nasal spray in my pocket on set that I would take in between takes to get me used to the action. I did try sniffing pepper on set for a few days to try and give me some kind of nasal discomfort. James and Rose have a lot of love for each other but there are times when they are pushed to the limit of what they can both deal with. There were a few car journeys from the unit base to locations when cold shoulders were the orders of the day. 


Probably the most surprising and amazing thing I’ve discovered about you was that you recently fostered a mother and her baby – how did that come about and why did you decide that this was something that you wanted to do?

Fostering is something we’ve always wanted to do. My wife is an experienced social worker having worked with children in child protection for many years. I remember when the Syrian Refugee Crisis hit the headlines a few years ago, we talked about how we could help, somehow. There are a lot of kids out there that need some love and care and we’ve always thought we could offer that alongside our own children. We went through a very thorough application process which was essentially a form of therapy, no stone unturned. We got accepted and decided we wanted to concentrate on Parent and Child Fostering. We had a mum and baby recently leave us after a 5 month placement with us. It was challenging of course but ultimately hugely rewarding. 

 
Is there one thing in particular that you’re really excited about for the future?

Seeing my children grow up and not knowing where my work will take me.

 
What advice would you give to your younger self?

Read more. I’ve never been a big reader. I’m better now. 

Abi Morgan’s The Split starts Tuesday 24th April at 9pm

PHOTOGRAPHY: JON CARTWRIGHT

INTERVIEW: ADAM CROOKES

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Interview: Charles Babalola on ‘Mary Magdalene’ and filming in Italy

 

Charles Babalola Photoshoot 2018CHARLES BABALOLA has been riding a huge wave of success over the past four years, starring in a mix of high-profile theatre, television and film projects since graduating from London Academy of Music & Dramatic Art back in 2014.

Charles has most recently been seen in Garth Davis‘ biblical drama film ‘Mary Magdalene’ – opposite Rooney Mara as the titular figure and Joaquin Phoenix as Jesus Christ. The film tells the biography of Mary Magdalene, one of the followers of Jesus, the founder of Christianity.

Whilst cementing a firm presence on the screen with roles in Netflix’s ‘Black Mirror’, ITV’s ‘Broadchurch’ and ‘Bancroft’ – Babalola has been performing alongside Bryan Cranston in the stage adaptation of the classic Oscar winning film ‘Network’.

In 2015, Charles received the Alan Bates Award, which was endowed to commemorate the late patron’s inspirational work on behalf of the Actors Centre and will is awarded annually to an actor of exceptional talent. I spoke to Charles Babalola about his roles in ‘Network’ and ‘Mary Magdalene’.

AC: ‘Network’ has been met with some rave reviews. In rehearsals, could you tell that this was going to be something special? 

CB: Well firstly the film is such a cult classic, which meant bringing this piece to the stage was a risk in itself, but the story is so poignant that we felt it has the potential to be something special. You can never tell how an audience is going to receive a production until the opening night, but because the sheer spectacle of this show, we knew it would definitely leave people asking questions which is one part of our job.

The set is really impressive, what surprised you about the production?

Definitely how immersive the director, Ivo Van Hove, made this production. I think that most people who watched it felt like they really engaged with something real. Even if you don’t like theatre, it’s a real immersive-theatrical and media driven show amalgamated in to two hours.

With the large screen showing everything captured on the cameras live on stage, how did that change the experience of it for you? 

Honestly, I didn’t really think about it too much. There are some scenes where I am on the screen but we had been working with the screens from day one in rehearsals so they became part of the makeup of the set from a very early stage. Of course, there are moments when you notice yourself on the screen out of the corner of your eye, but it wasn’t really a distraction.

Charles Babalola Photoshoot 2018

Did it challenge you more?

Well the fact that one minute we are performing live theatre, and then the next you have to tone it down for the camera was definitely a challenge. It’s not something I thought too much about, but it’s inevitable you become very aware when 900 people are watching your huge face on a screen an even bigger screen at the back of the stage.

Tell us about your role in ‘Network’…

Charles Babalola Photoshoot 2018I play Harry Hunter who is the associate producer of the fictional news network ‘UBS’. He can be extremely straight laced and doesn’t care about anything other than getting the job done. He also has an interesting relationship with Bryan’s character Howard Beale; they fail to see eye to eye on a lot of work related issues
which leads to quite a few heated exchanges.

‘Mary Magdalene’ has received some polarizing reviews as did ‘The Passion Of The Christ’, why do you think this is?

Well, when making this film I was fully aware that biblical films are not everyone’s cup of tea, because everyone has an opinion on what really happened. This can be a difficult element in telling these stories especially to people who are religious, or of the specific denomination. I think all you can do as an actor is do the detailed research and be as truthful in the portrayal of the character and the story. But all together really happy with this one!




What does the film mean to you?
This is a story of a woman who was forbidden to be around men but fought for what she believed in. For me this is a story of hope and never giving up on what you truly believe in.

With the film being shot in Italy, what did you think of the locations?

This was one of the best parts of shooting this film. Italy is one of the most beautiful countries in the world and we had the opportunity to shoot in Sicily, Matera, Martina Franca and Naples – mainly in the south of Italy. All beautiful locations which served the film perfectly. Naples was my favourite because of the amazing pizza, the beautiful people and the vibrancy of the city.

So what kind of projects are you working on for the rest of the year?

Hopefully some good film and TV projects. I’m reading and meeting for a lot of things now so let’s see what the future holds.

Charles Babalola Photoshoot 2018

QUICK QUESTIONS WITH CHARLES BABALOLA

Last movie you watched?

‘You Were Never Really Here’ (amazing!).

Best show to binge-watch?

‘Breaking Bad’ or ‘The Night Of’.

What’s on your music playlist at the moment?

Tribe Called Quest, the Black Panther soundtrack and Daniel Caesar.

Best store to visit in a shopping mall?

Footlocker 

Advice to your younger self?

Enjoy every moment and don’t care what other people think. 

Starstruck moment?

Meeting Oprah Winfrey, she came to see the play.

Is there one thing in particular that you’re really excited about for the future?

Travelling and seeing the world.

A sport you wish you could play?

Tennis

Dream dinner-party guests?

P Diddy, David Beckham, Dave Chappelle, Ian Wright.

What was the last book you read?

Outliers by Malcom Gladwell

‘Mary Magdalene’ is in cinemas now

PHOTOGRAPHY: BARTEK SZYMIGULSKI

STYLING: KRISHAN PARMAR

GROOMING: CHARLOTTE YEOMANS

INTERVIEW: ADAM CROOKES